How the bank almost got me

Banks are funny things. Credit cards are funny things too. There’s something about turning money from something heavy and real to numbers in a computer that seems to make it much less…worthy. More like monopoly money that we shuffle among ourselves than real,  valuable currency.

 

Prior to this year, I’ve never had a credit card. I was burned my first year out of home when my bank offered a ‘complimentary overdraft’ on my account of $2,000. It vanished in a matter of months (a good chunk of that went on a shopping spree when my little sister came to visit), and I’m pretty sure I was paying it off for the next two years. Lesson learned! There’s nothing more depressing than getting a paycheck and realising that none of that money is even technically ‘yours’- it all has to go straight to the bank.

Cut to five years later and I was finally tempted back into the world of credit by an unmissable offer on a card with no annual fee. I’m pretty on top of my spending now, so as long as I was careful to pay off my card each month, I was getting 50,000 frequent flyer points for free! How could anything possibly go wrong?

 

Ahhh, but here’s the thing the credit card companies know that we’ve all probably figured out the hard way – chances are, you’re going to be unconsciously spending a buttload more if you’re putting it on plastic.

Don’t ask me how it works, I reckon it’s hoodoovoodoo. All I know is, for the three months I was putting every payment on card, my spending was sitting a lot higher than it normally would- even though I have a rock solid budget and I knew exactly how they were trying to hook me!

Now I’m not saying I’ve been flashing around dolla dolla bills y’all…

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Does anyone think that getting hit by a solid gold coin would really hurt?

…probably worth it though

…but a brunch here, a book purchase there- it all starts to add up across the course of a month. And if you’re not seeing those purchases appear on your statement for a few days, it’s easy to forget that it even happened, and so you’re ok to spend juuuust a little more until that hideous bill arrives at the end of the month. Hoodoovoodoo!

So I’ve tried being a credit-carrying adult, and I guess I failed? Or maybe realising that I was altering my spending habits means that this counts as a pass (after all, you should never let the bank win).

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This card came with a year of free usage and as a newbie to the credit card rewards world, I have to confess that I’m still bemused and amazed that every month I’m racking in more frequent flyer points off my daily spending than I did flying to the other side of the world (!!) I still have seven months of free card usage before I have to cancel it, so it seems a waste to leave it in a drawer and miss out on some of those points that could help me get back across the world in the next few years. But how to do it without having to chip into my savings to cover that extra bit of free spending I’ve been suckered into?

I’ve decided to come to a compromise- bills are going to keep going on the card, but for the rest of my spending, cash is back to being King, baby. I’m going ol’ school and withdrawing my spending money for the week until I’ve built up my savings again. Time to go back to filling that piggy bank with change!

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Yes, I’ll take any excuse to GIF my spirit animal

This post was triggered by the extremely disturbing ‘debit card for pocket money’ that facebook threw up at me because apparently it thinks I should have spawned some rugrats by now. It looks like a great idea on the surface- parents can preload cash for their kids and the app seems to have integrated savings system- but with Visa pulling the strings, it all gets a little icky. On top of an annual card fee for the pleasure of not handing your kids cold, hard cash, I’m not sure parents should be comfortable letting one of the biggest credit card companies in the world groom your pre-teen for credit card ownership. What do you think?

 

 


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How the bank almost got me

2 thoughts on “How the bank almost got me

  1. Hey, from one failure to another… Not having (or using) a credit card isn’t such a bad thing! It’s almost like credit card companies have figure out ways to make money off the people that use them! Using a credit card doesn’t automatically doom you to a life of destitute squalor, but you’re certainly not going to rocket to the top of the 1%ers on your airline miles, either. Slow and steady, Abbie! You know the drill, don’t get discouraged 🙂

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