Gratuitous Gratitude Time

I’ve been doing some writing recently for a great little startup that involved creating a series of emails to guide their customers through a very basic mindfulness practice. The most recent dispatch introduced the idea of gratitude and the importance of acknowledging the great things in life as you look back (or forward) over the day. It was only as I sat down to write this post that I realised that’s not something I’ve been practicing regularly in my own life! So here they are, the three things I’m grateful for today:

  1. That the $13 I have left in my wallet to last the weekend just means that I’m sticking to my budget and watching my savings grow
  2. That I can afford to rent my beautiful little apartment to share with my sassy little fluffball and no-one else (introverts unite!). It’s been 18 months now and I still get an overwhelming sense of peace every time I put my key in the front door.
  3. That I have a week in Tasmania coming up with a bunch of amazing girls! Two weeks to go until whiskey tours, endless cheese and late nights around a fire with the best company a gal could ask for.

You know what? It felt really great to write that list! I think it’s so easy to get swept up in what I still need to achieve, that it’s nice to sit back and look at what I’ve already got.

What are you grateful for this week? Let me know in the comments below!

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Gratuitous Gratitude Time

Have you embraced your Freebie? (Tom Hiddleston has)

While enjoying my morning routine of interwebs and procrastination – yes, I know I’m trying to cut down, but sometimes a gal has a moment of weakness and that moment is every morning ever.

Anyway, while browsing I came across this fun nugget of trivia that I’m sure everyone but me has probably already stumbled across. Apparently Kingofthebritishgentlemen Tom Hiddleston originally wanted to audition for the role of Thor in the Marvel Universe.

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Oh, darling

According to rumours, he actually got close to the final audition rounds before director/Shakespeare God Kenneth Branagh pulled him aside to gently break the news that they weren’t going to be offering him the part-

“Ken told me that every actor has something for free. Jack Nicholson has an irreverence for free, Anthony Hopkins has a majesty and gravitas for free. Idris Elba, who plays Heimdall in Thor – and, by the way, anyone who’s been complaining about a black actor being cast as a Norse god is just crazy; this is a fantasy world, for goodness sake – has a watchful gravitas for free. He explained that what I have for free is that I can’t turn off my intelligence. Therefore Loki would be much more up my street.”

How cool is that thought? That there’s some trait that’s so inherently you, that it’s just suffused into every role you’ll ever play- no need to work for it, it’s always just there. And the more I think of it, the more I can list actors and their ‘freebies’. Morgan Freeman has that playful God vibe, Helen Mirran (my queen) has that edge of ‘don’t mess with me bitch’- And Hugh Grant? Floppy fringe. I don’t think he can act without it

Acting world aside, I got to thinking of my own Freebie in the real world- the part of my personality that is just waiting to burst out. I would say that mine is enthusiasm. Push the right buttons and I will gush at a hundred words a minute about something I’m passionate about (you don’t want to be near me when you’re complaining about an unexpected bill, or how you don’t have any savings). The same will happen if anyone even breathes about a theatre piece I love, or some passing obsession that I currently have. It’s like my brain is wired to thrive on that endorphin kick I get from being ridiculously over-excited about anything.

I think I look like this…

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But I really look like this…

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For so long I’ve spent time apologising for my random outbursts, or trying to pretend that I am waaaay cooler than I actually am by moderating my responses (sound familiar?).

Recently I’ve started to wonder if maybe it isn’t just better to embrace that side of myself. And if I come off a little manic (and maybe a little ax-murdery, as has been mentioned in the past) then phooey- playing a serial killer is definitely on my to-do list anyway.

And if I know what makes me a little more ‘me’, then maybe that will help me pinpoint when I’m losing myself a little. If I can’t be bothered to muster a kitten scratch or a suggestion than an actor should roll their fifteen super funds into one account, then something is wrong in my life and I need to identify it. Because not having the time to scratch a kitten? Definitely not me.

So what would your freebie be? Is it something that you’re happy to indulge in, or something that only your nearest & dearest get to see? Maybe you have the dryest sense of humour, or you can’t help working to turn any room you walk into into a place of calm. Maybe you don’t even know what yours is yet (Hiddles clearly needed some help). Or am I raving (with enthusiasm) on a topic that isn’t really applicable in the real world?

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Have you embraced your Freebie? (Tom Hiddleston has)

I solemnly swear that I’m up to some good

It’s easy (for me, at least) to spend a fair bit of time thinking about where my money is going- or rather, where it’s vanishing to.

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This month I want to start spending more time thinking about where my money is going. And yes, that is a very important set of italics.

I’ve reached a stage with my money where I’m no longer the panicking, impoverished arts student. I wouldn’t say that I’m functioning with a grown-up level of income (what’s a real job again?) but I am at a point where it’s time to start thinking about how my spending is serving the world – what lives am I changing, what values am I representing?

I’ll be the first to raise my hand and confess that I’m frequently guilty of going for the bottom line. Why bother spending top dollar on some boring essential when I can duck down to Big W and get what I need for just a few dollars? But it’s time to stop kidding myself (and yes, this hurts). More often than not that bottom dollar is supporting sweat-shop labour, unsafe conditions, and probably terrible environmental practices.

If I’m voting with my money, then I sure don’t want it to be going to those people. I want to live in a world stuffed full of companies that are truly trying to make a difference! Hell, I want to live in a world that still looks like our world in fifty years. If that means shopping a little more mindfully and perhaps forking out more for businesses that support my goals, then I guess that’s a small price to pay.

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WALL-E is adorable, but not if his world becomes our reality

While I’m at it, I’m going to do my best to support the people with the dreams! The good folk in my area who have taken the dive and are trying to make good when the whole world says they can’t. I’m talking delicious freshly baked breads, beautiful plants (from somewhere other than the supermarket I’msosorryIcan’tleavethemtheretheyneedmeeee), handmade ceramics, locally grown organics, coffee from that new spot that just needs time to become the next big thing. Doesn’t that just sound like the dream?

And maybe I will have to make some sacrifices to follow through. Maybe I cut down my takeaway coffee habit to so there’s money to pay more for my veges, or maybe I save for the items I truly want to bring into my life from suppliers that I honestly want to support. The great thing about having a budget is that it’s totally possible to look at your spendings in black & white and re-evaluate as circumstances change.

I’m not going to lie, this is going to be hard for me. After so many years of being dirt-poor, parting with more money than I absolutely have to is going to take some getting used to. But I’m going to take a big ol’ breath and let go of the reins a little, putting my money where my mouth is. Because what’s the point of money, if we’re not using it to make the world a better place?


Thanks for reading! Don’t forget to subscribe for updates, and if you want to see more of me, come say hello on my Instagram or Twitter, I would love to see you there!

I solemnly swear that I’m up to some good

How to win at Rewards Programs

I love a good reward program.

Growing up in a family with three young children and a business to run, I think that money must have frequently been tight for my parents. I don’t recall ever noticing that it was a problem though, because if the toaster broke down, a new one would arrive through flybuys. Grandparent’s birthday coming up? There were department store gift vouchers to spend from credit card points. I learned from watching my parents that if you were patient and consistent, reward schemes could be used to bridge gaps or nab those products no-one ever really wants to spend money on.

Once I moved to Australia, I discovered that loyalty schemes really weren’t as big of a thing- back home in NZ, it seemed to me growing up that everywhere offered Flybuys! I think people of my age saw me as a bit of an oddball as I dutifully signed up for a variety of reward programs and scanned my card with every purchase. What about my personal data?? (Look, if The Man wants to know how many times a week I buy bananas, they’re welcome to that knowledge)

It took a while for points to accumulate but when my trashy plastic smoothie blender started spewing smoke about six months ago, I jumped online & voila! Enough points saved up for a slimline fancy model and free shipping to boot. One less thing that I have to waste my hard earned money on, and a pricier  model than I could have ever afforded to splurge on! Which is win-win, because I’m trusting that it will last longer than an inferior version, and the warrantee is better if it doesn’t. Quality over high-churn plastic, folks!

The benefits aside, nothing every really comes for free, and most Reward Programs are very cleverly set up to slowly tempt you into parting with more of your hard-earned money. Here are a few things I’ve learned (some the hard way), that mean you can be sure that you’re always coming out on top.

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THOU SHALT NOT CHANGE THY SPENDING HABITS

The Man never wants you to have something for free. Any loyalty scheme you sign up to will constantly be trying to edge your spend a little higher, and then just a liiiitle higher again. Resist, friends! If an offer is tempted you to spend more than you’ve budgeted or intended to spend, disregard it immediately. Spending more than you want to means that you’re not winning at all- if you weren’t intending to drop $40 on that shiny new product but the thought of those extra 300 points is oh-so-tempting, step awaaaay from the offer. You’re not that easy to play!

THOU SHALT SIGN UP WISELY

Never really shop at a certain store? Don’t let them talk you into signing up for their reward scheme. You don’t need that sort of clutter in your life and handing over your contact details just results in the temptation of endless sales. Save your buying power for programs where you actually have a chance of redeeming for a reward.

THOU SHALT RECONSIDER PROGRAMS AS CIRCUMSTANCES CHANGE

There are two main supermarkets near my house. Coles offers Flybuys, and Woolworths offers Everyday Rewards. As you can probably guess, traditionally I’ve been more of a Coles girl, preferring to save points towards a product redemption than a cash discount off my shopping. However, recently Everyday Rewards recently upped their game by offering conversion of their points to Qantas Frequent Flyers- the same rewards system my credit cards work towards. What’s a girl to do? With over $100 of Flybuys value stockpiled for a rainy day, my efforts don’t need to be focused there. Time to watch those Frequent Flyer points grow!

THOU SHALT PLAY REWARDS SCHEMES OFF AGAINST EACH OTHER

Here’s the thing- rewards schemes do farm my data. Do I really care? Not particularly- how much I spend on Cookies n’ Cream isn’t information that I would care about handing to a stranger on the street, so I have no problems with the supermarket knowing it either. And there is a massive upside to them tracking my spending. After my switch to Woolworths, you know what happened? Coles got a little bit lonely! They started sending me emails- ‘Spend $90 a week for four weeks and get $50 off your next shop!’

Sorry Coles, that’s more than my weekly budget, and as we all know from the first rule of Rewards Programs, you don’t change your spending to earn a reward. Even spending an extra $10 a week on products I don’t need would have made the $50 reward redundant.

I stick to my Woolworths spending.

A few weeks later- ‘Spend $70 a week for four weeks and get $50 off your next shop!’ Now we’re talking! $50 is a decent chunk of a week’s shopping, so I switch my supermarket for a month and enjoy a final week with a sizeable chunk off my final spend.

Can you guess what happened next? You betcha- I get an email from lonely little Woolworths- ‘Spend $80 a week for four weeks and get 12,000 bonus points.’

Now I know it’s hard to grasp the value of those points, but to give it perspective, Woolworths normally offers one point per dollar spend- so those 12,000 points are a mighty big apple that can be converted into some pretty big savings. I swap back.

Do I think that either of these huge supermarket chains actually care about me as a customer? No way. But I do think that they have very smart computers that track changes in my spending habits and link me to offers accordingly. Make them panic and see what your big dollar reward scheme will do for you.

THOU SHALT NEVER LET THE CREDIT CARD WIN

For the most part, I am SO against credit cards- like most financial nerds, I see the spiraling holes that they can suck people into. Any support that I’m about to offer for their schemes is conditionally that you’re in control of your finances enough to be currently living debt free. Again, THOU SHALL NEVER LET THE CREDIT CARD WIN.

We good? I’ll continue.

Credit Cards offer some of the fastest ways to earn rewards on everyday spends- however when tempted by a credit card reward scheme, it’s important to consider the value of what they’re offering to you. Amex offer a huge return on rewards, but their cards are also hella expensive. Do you want to be paying $400 a year for your card to receive $400 of travel credit you’re realistically not going to have time to use?

And then there’s the other trap, where a card seems reasonably priced, but when you get down to the nitty gritty, the points on offer still aren’t worth it. Indulge your inner financial nerd, google the actual dollar value of the points on offer. For those playing along at home, apparently a Qantas Frequent Flyer point is currently worth around $0.02 (depending on how they’re redeemed). So if a company is offering 10,000 bonus points, you’re looking at roughly a $200 usable value. If the card has an annual fee of $150, is it really worth it? Or if you have to meet a minimum spend to activate those points, is that spend going to push you way above your usual budget? Could it be that they’re really just trying to groom you into a spending habit? THOU SHALT NEVER LET THE CREDIT CARD WIN.

But Abbie, don’t you have a credit card?

You’re right, dear reader. Consider me busted. But while doing all my credit card research, I stumbled across a credit card that was offering me Qantas Frequent Flyer points- the same points I had already collected for flying to Italy and back. If I met their minimum spend for the first three months of the card, I received 50,000 bonus points (to put that in context, I received about 5,000 for flying to the other side of the world). On top of those points, I would continue to receive 1.5 points for each dollar spent- and the kicker?

The card is absolutely free.

The bank is so keen on turning me into a dedicated credit user that they’re happy to offer me a carrot I can’t refuse. Why? They’re trusting that having to meet my minimum spend for the first three months is going to groom me into a spending habit. They’re trusting that I’ll be negligent about paying off my balance every month and they’ll get me with interest. They’re trusting that I’ll either forget to cancel the card, or be so hooked that I’ll happy pay the $249 annual fee the following year.

Falling prey to any of these points means the Credit Card wins –THOU SHALT… I’m not going to repeat the point again, you get it.  You’re playing the banks at a game they pay people a lot of money to ensure you lose. You’ve got to keep on top of the ball if you want to come out on top.

….

THOU SHALT NOT LET THE CREDIT CARD WIN

(Sorry, I couldn’t help myself)

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Do you participate in any rewards programs? Did I miss anything? I would love to hear what you think!


Thanks for reading! Don’t forget to subscribe for updates, and if you want to see more of me, come say hello on my Instagram or Twitter, I would love to see you there!

How to win at Rewards Programs

When it’s time to say No

We live in a world that places value on Yes. Yes to staying late at work, Yes to the third girls night out in a month, Yes to that upsize.

Yes means that you’re a team player, a go-getter, someone who’s seizing every opportunity that life throws your way. But do you also sometimes feel trapped by the big Y-E-S?

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(Gratuitous Hiddles GIF because we’re getting deep)

As I’ve detailed before, when I’m not able to make ends meet with acting gigs, I cover my bills with a variety of casual jobs. These all dove-tail nicely and usually mean that I’m able to earn more than I need to to keep afloat. And I mean way more. It’s completely normal to get a ‘By the way, are you free on…’ every time I’m in an office. My knee-jerk reaction is always to say yes, because who’s going to turn down extra money? If I don’t practice my No muscle, there are times when I can look at my diary and realise that I’ve worked 50-60 hours in a week. My workplaces are probably grateful to have an extra set of hands available and I know that my bank account always sure appreciates the extra boost, but how is any of that helping me move towards what I actually want in life? Looked at objectively, my Yes is serving everyone but me.

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The self-sacrificing Yes can disguise itself in a number of ways.

Online sales are my weaknesssss- I’m the person that will open a dozen tabs and add hundreds of dollars of items to my cart before coming to my senses and leaving everything behind. So where has my Yes to their emailed invitation gotten me? I’ve probably wasted a few hours of work time and decided that I need to completely overhaul my wardrobe, browsing the sale was really only the good little capitalist in me trying to burn my hard earned money on some low-cost, sweatshop clothing. Is that really what I’m working for?

The real irony is, the more I’ve been working in a day-job, the harder it is for me to resist the chance to throw my money away. I’ll find myself engaging in hard-core research for products I don’t even need, because deep down I’m trying to justify the overwork. I’m working so hard so I deserve to spend money on the things I want – or the things they tell me I want. And then what do I have to do to replace the money I spent?

Bingo. I say yes to overtime again.

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Sometimes not using your Yes won’t make sense to the rest of the world.

This whole blog post started in my head last night when I went to grab a burger on the run for dinner. At the end of my order, I was offered sauce for an extra 50c and obviously said yes because aoli is life.

And then I got ‘and what drink would you like?’

The options on offer were canned soft drink (which I’m avoiding because I’m trying to deny that it’s time for a visit to the dentist) or bottled water (see here and here for the back story on that one).

‘None, thank you’.

‘None?’

‘No thanks’

‘Are you sure? It’s free with the sauce.’

‘I’m good, but thanks’

‘Not even a water?’

‘No thank you.’

I had to turn down a free drink four times before she would accept my answer.

Because who doesn’t say yes to free? Crazy people, that’s who!

Saying Yes would sure have ended the conversation sooner. But then where would I have been? Technically I would have been up the cost of a water, but why do I need it? I had a bottle in my bag, and if I had taken the plastic bottle it would have lurked on my conscience all night.

No matter how badly the lovely woman wanted me to follow the purchase path (probably making her till order easier) and take the ferdydurking free water, withholding my Yes was what was better for me. (Okay, technically it was more of a series of very polite No’s, but you get the point. I’ll write on the power of a good No another day.)

Treasure your Yes-es as if you had a finite amount to give- because you do! How many times can you say Yes to everyone before you suffer a complete breakdown?

Save them for the things that will bring you joy. Say Yes to that movie with friends, that extra-nice bottle of wine, or that short film that you really don’t have time to do but the script is just so.damned.good (guilty). Save your Yes-es for the things that will feed your soul, because at the end of the day, you’re the only one who has to live in the life you’re creating.

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PSA: This post is written from the perspective of a compulsive Yes-er. If you think that mayyybe you’re a compulsive No-er, you go and sprinkle those Yes-es like stardust, you beautiful little nay-sayer!


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When it’s time to say No

5 Ways I Slash My Spending (because actor’s life y’all)

As a performer, life can have some ups and downs. Even with my Diversified Income Stream (I’m thinking of getting a trademark on that), without the regularity of a salaried 9-5 job money can sometimes get thin on the ground – perhaps I’ve taken some time of for a fun independent project or for a holiday. Or maybe it’s just been an expensive week!

Either way, here’s a list of the first five things I cut when it’s time to start trimming the budget. Ready? Let’s do this

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1. Bought Lunches

Yes, they’re easier and yes, I get that little hormonal kick that comes with spending money. BUT if I’m buying lunches for a week then that’s probably close to $100 that could be stretched into a full week of groceries. If money is tight, buying any prepackaged food is off the table (badum-tish). Bulk buy, cook a batch of something you’re happy to look at every day for a week, and get ready to save that moolah.

2. Movie Outings

Movies are my haven. When I emerge blinking into the sunlight after a good movie, it feels like my brain has gone through a wash-dry cycle and it’s ready to face another week. I normally head to the cinema on a Monday or Tuesday when tickets are cheaper, but even then I’m easily tempted by popcorn or a bottle of local brew. If I can’t trust myself to steer clear of the snacks, movie outings are out until my income stabalises. Time to stay home and make the most of Netflix instead!

3. Meat

Yup, you heard it. I’m not a vegetarian, but I always opt for free-range produce which is at the top end of the price range. Adding meat to a meal can instantly up the price by $10 or more so if I’m trimming my spendings, meat is one of the first things to go. No, I don’t replace meat with beans- beans are death.

4. Fancy Food

Yes, most of these points revolve around food. That’s because A) it’s my weakness, and B) The supermarket shop is the easiest way for me to slash my short-term spending. If I have less money than expected for a week or so, fancy foods are out. That means no protein bars, no out-of-season fruit and definitely no super-flash ice-creams. Remember, these are my short term solutions – I’m pretty sure that I can survive without Ben & Jerrie’s for a week or so (….pretty sure)

5. My Bank Card

Because I just can’t trust myself (see Point 2.)

Leaving my bank card at home means there is no way those extra little costs can accrue. I have a mental blind spot when it comes to pot plants and books, so those always seem to wrangle their way past my iron resolve to not spend money. Deciding in advance how much money I can spare for the week and pulling out that money in cash is the best way to ensure that I don’t end up in debt before that next paycheck comes through.

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And there you go! Five steps to cut that daily spending fast.

Take a cold, hard look at your bank statement and be honest with yourself, what’s on your list? If you had to survive for a few weeks less than your normal budget, what would you cut?


If you want to see more of me, you can check out my Instagram & Twitter, I would love to see you there!

 

5 Ways I Slash My Spending (because actor’s life y’all)

Question Time!

So a while back I floated the idea on Instagram of doing a Q&A post. I wasn’t sure if I would get any response at all, but one of my intentions with this blog was to provide an insight into what it’s actually like to be an actress at the start of a career and to do that I needed an idea of what people actually wanted to know!

Bless their little cotton softs, there were so many lovely people who were happy to provide questions. So many that I’ve decided to split this topic into a few posts! Keep your eyes peeled for Part Two next week, and I would love it if you added any questions of your own below!

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  • A disclaimer before we begin- like any non-linear career, every actor’s story is their own. Even without taking into account the huuuuuge differences between acting in the US, UK and Australia, my opinions and experiences could be a world away from those of the girl seated next to me in an audition waiting room. I will try to be absolutely honest with every question, but please bear in mind that end of the day I’m only one gal trying to make it in the cruel actors world, and my answers will reflect that!

 

How do you get an agent?

For me, not easily!

Usually agents will sign someone in one of three ways:

  • After seeing their work in person
  • After having someone recommended to them by an actor they already represent
  • After being approached by an actor looking to join their ranks (this route can be very tricky!)

Most graduates in Australia get to have a graduation showing for agents in their final year but I was immigrating from New Zealand a few months out of drama school,  too late to get seen in the wave of new graduates! With no Australian credits to my name it was a hard slog to be seen among the crowds of talented bright young things
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According to a frustrating & oft-quoted maxim, you have to be working to get an agent, and you need an agent to get work!

Fortunately, after booking a small independent production of Hair, I did end up managing to land representation with my first agent. With her I was able to build a small body of work, which made it easier for me to move on when the time came.

 

When should you get an agent?

In my opinion, as soon as you can! If you’re wanting to make any money from acting, you’re going to need an agent to act as your go-between. It’s rare to find a Casting Director who’s happy to send out briefs to individual actors, so an agent is your gateway to the bigger auditions.

(NB. A reputable agent is never going to charge you for doing their job- their pay is through a cut of your total earnings whenever you actually book a gig. While they might encourage you to get new head shots  or a show-reel, it’s a big red flag if they’re requiring you to have these done by a particular photographer – any agent insisting on this could be making a nice kick-back on referring actors they never expect to actually work.)

At the start of your career you’ll probably find that an agency happy to represent you is going to be sending you in for bit parts and perhaps extras roles. Don’t stress, once you’ve added a few lines to your CV and started to build a relationship with the people doing the casting, you’ll slowly work your way up the ladder!

Contrary to how it seems in the media, there are very few overnight successes – people spending millions of dollars on a few minutes of film like to work with people that they know have proven themselves time and time again. This is a journey that actors go on with their agent, so it’s important to find someone that you’re comfortable taking advice from, and that you can go to with your questions.

 

The audition process!

Ahh auditions, the bread & butter of the actor’s world.

There’s a long running joke that an actor really gets paid for all the waiting around on set, the acting is something we would happily do for free. I feel like we really get paid for all of the auditioning we do, only you don’t see a penny of that pay until you actually book a job!

Every audition starts with a Casting Director sending out a brief to all the agents they’re in contact with. If I suit the role my agent will submit me, and if the CD agrees with my agent, I’ll get an audition time! For screen work, this could be as soon as first thing the next morning, or even later that day. For theatre it might be a little longer, and with musicals you normally have a few weeks to prepare because the rumours start flying long before the production is officially announced!

Once I have my audition booked, it’s time to prep. For a musical, I’m looking for two 32-bar (about 30 seconds of music) of contrasting pieces that are similar to what the show would require of me. I have a folder with options ready to go, so it’s normally just a matter of brushing up. For theatre I might need to bring in a monologue, or I might be sent a scene to work through. With TV or film, there is usually always a scene, (although if the audition is for an ad, there might not be any lines in that script to learn!)

For all the stress and preparation that goes into an audition, they can feel a little anti-climactic. You’ll do your prepared work once, and maybe get a few alterations before trying it again. And that’s it! It’s rare to be in that room for more than ten minutes in a first call.

If it’s a smaller screen or commercial role audition, this could be the whole process! I’ll get notified if I’m On Hold, and then I’ll either be released or booked (at which stage I do a happy dance and finally let people know I actually auditioned for something).

For everything else, my agent will be notified if I have a callback and she will pass it on to me. There will normally be more material to prepare, and probably a slightly longer audition with more important people in the room. I’ve never had more than two audition rounds, but I know people who have had to go through five or more rounds, including being flown interstate for even more important people! Needless to say, it definitely gets to a stage where actors are throwing their hands up in the air and pleading ‘just make up your mind already!’

 

There must be lots of people auditioning for a part. How do you cope with rejection when they pick someone else?

I touched on this question in On auditioning & my love life…, but it’s always an interesting one to revisit. Basically, just like dating, there are going to be times when not getting that phone call is enough to make you call a mental health day and crawl back into bed with Netflix and a tub of icecream. However, I promise that the more times you go through it, the easier it gets!

I’ve now trained the people around me to never go ‘Did you hear back about X??’, and if I can get away with it, I won’t even mention when I’ve been auditioning. I’ve learned that for me, the easiest way to cope with the very surreal audition cycle is to go into the room, have fun, and then forget all about it. I find if I get too worked up over booking a job or imagining what it could do for my career, I just twist myself up into knots and it’s impossible to take good care of my mental health if every ‘failed’ audition is taken as a personal reflection of my abilities.

The thing that I’ve learned over time with auditioning, is that my abilities may not factor into the decision at all! As long as I can prove I’m good enough to be considered, then a whoooole other score of factors come into play. Am I the look they’re after? Do they want someone more ethnically diverse? Do I look too similar to someone that’s already cast? Is my ‘vibe’ not quite what they were after? So many things that I have absolutely no control over, it would drive a person nuts trying to worry about them!

As an example, I was once placed on hold for a TV Commercial (which means that the producers were trying to decide between myself & normally one other person, and both of us have to keep the shoot date available until they can make up their minds). I didn’t book the gig, and didn’t think much more about it until I saw the commercial on TV a few months later and finally met my ‘competition’…

She was over 60 years old!

During that time we were both on hold, the producers weren’t tossing up between two similar actors trying to decide which one was ‘better’, they were looking at two completely different finished products and trying to decide which one conveyed the message they were after!

So it helps me to remember my TV Commercial ‘competition’ whenever I’m getting twisted up over a role. Once I’ve walked out of that audition room, my job is done.

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How difficult are open calls?

Open calls aren’t as big a thing in Australia as they apparently are overseas, as they’re not required by the unions. It’s mostly the US companies that come over here to audition (cruise ships, Universal & Disney) that have the big ‘cattle calls’ so they’re still a novelty for us Aussies. Having said that, I have attended a few of them!

The biggest difficulty attending an open call is that the day is long. Like, super long. You can be at that same studio for a full 9-hour work day, and only spend a maximum of 30minutes actually auditioning – around 2 minutes doing the vocal call, and the remainder of that time in a dance or vocal callback (if they like what they see in your first audition and want to test you a little more). And for the rest of that time? You wait. And you wait. And you wait.

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And that can be the fun part of open calls! There’s bound to be a friend or two that you haven’t seen in months, and it’s always good to make new connections as well. Cram a hundred highly-strung performers into a room and there will always be something interesting going on.

 

What do you look for in a role?

Ooo, a tricky question!

If it’s an audition that has come through my agent, then it’s something that I would only consider turning down if there was something in the material that I find seriously objectionable. Otherwise, I trust that my agent and the casting director have both looked at the work and found it worth their (and my) time.

If I find that I haven’t been working a lot and want to get back in front of a camera (or on stage), then I might start casting the net for independent or student work. These are the sorts of projects that I am much pickier with. I look for a well-written script that captures me, and a role that will hopefully challenge me but is also something that I would be believable in. Equally as importantly, I’m hunting for a professional team of people that are all working with the same goal in mind (creating great work in a tight time-frame). There’s nothing more frustrating than turning up for an unpaid day on set and then being put on ice for five hours because the crew are still ‘deciding on their setup’. I learned that mistake the hard way!

 


 

What do you think? Are my answers what you expected? I would love to know! There are still a bunch of fantastic questions waiting to be answered, including my theatre rituals, what it’s like to finish a show, and where I like to go on holiday!

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